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Congressman Joe Courtney

Representing the 2nd District of Connecticut

New data shows Affordable Care Act saved eastern Connecticut seniors more than $15 million on prescription drugs in 2014

February 25, 2015
Press Release
WASHINGTON, DC – New data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) shows that 13,068 seniors in Connecticut’s Second District saved $15,008,480 on prescription drugs in 2014—an average of $1,149 per beneficiary—thanks to provisions in the Affordable Care Act that are closing the ‘donut hole’ in Medicare Part D coverage. These numbers show increased savings over 2013, when 12,262 beneficiaries saved $14,474,351. These totals dwarf the $10,849,307 eastern Connecticut seniors saved in 2012, and will continue to grow each year until the Part D donut hole is completely phased out in 2020.
Since 2010, Medicare beneficiaries have received financial help on prescription drug costs thanks to the Affordable Care Act. The law phases out the Medicare Part D donut hole—the statutory gap in coverage where beneficiaries are responsible for the full out-of-pocket drug costs.  In 2013 and 2014, Medicare beneficiaries who reached the Part D donut hole received a 52.5 percent discount on brand-name drugs and a 21 percent discount on generic drugs. These discount percentages increase to 55 and 35, respectively, for 2015.
“These savings are providing significant relief to seniors who have had to pay hundreds—or even thousands—out-of-pocket for necessary prescription drugs,” said Congressman Courtney. “For many eastern Connecticut seniors on fixed incomes, average savings of more than $1,100 per year means the difference between buying medication or food, and being able to live with dignity in retirement. In addition, the ACA has stabilized Medicare Part B premiums, which have not increased since 2013.”
The chart below shows the top 20 eastern Connecticut towns with the largest savings totals in 2014: 
WASHINGTON, DC – New data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) shows that 13,068 seniors in Connecticut’s Second District saved $15,008,480 on prescription drugs in 2014—an average of $1,149 per beneficiary—thanks to provisions in the Affordable Care Act that are closing the ‘donut hole’ in Medicare Part D coverage. These numbers show increased savings over 2013, when 12,262 beneficiaries saved $14,474,351. These totals dwarf the $10,849,307 eastern Connecticut seniors saved in 2012, and will continue to grow each year until the Part D donut hole is completely phased out in 2020.
Since 2010, Medicare beneficiaries have received financial help on prescription drug costs thanks to the Affordable Care Act. The law phases out the Medicare Part D donut hole—the statutory gap in coverage where beneficiaries are responsible for the full out-of-pocket drug costs.  In 2013 and 2014, Medicare beneficiaries who reached the Part D donut hole received a 52.5 percent discount on brand-name drugs and a 21 percent discount on generic drugs. These discount percentages increase to 55 and 35, respectively, for 2015.
“These savings are providing significant relief to seniors who have had to pay hundreds—or even thousands—out-of-pocket for necessary prescription drugs,” said Congressman Courtney. “For many eastern Connecticut seniors on fixed incomes, average savings of more than $1,100 per year means the difference between buying medication or food, and being able to live with dignity in retirement. In addition, the ACA has stabilized Medicare Part B premiums, which have not increased since 2013.”
The chart below shows the top 20 eastern Connecticut towns with the largest savings totals in 2014: 
WASHINGTON, DC – New data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) shows that 13,068 seniors in Connecticut’s Second District saved $15,008,480 on prescription drugs in 2014—an average of $1,149 per beneficiary—thanks to provisions in the Affordable Care Act that are closing the ‘donut hole’ in Medicare Part D coverage. These numbers show increased savings over 2013, when 12,262 beneficiaries saved $14,474,351. These totals dwarf the $10,849,307 eastern Connecticut seniors saved in 2012, and will continue to grow each year until the Part D donut hole is completely phased out in 2020.
 
Since 2010, Medicare beneficiaries have received financial help on prescription drug costs thanks to the Affordable Care Act. The law phases out the Medicare Part D donut hole—the statutory gap in coverage where beneficiaries are responsible for the full out-of-pocket drug costs.  In 2013 and 2014, Medicare beneficiaries who reached the Part D donut hole received a 52.5 percent discount on brand-name drugs and a 21 percent discount on generic drugs. These discount percentages increase to 55 and 35, respectively, for 2015.
 
“These savings are providing significant relief to seniors who have had to pay hundreds—or even thousands—out-of-pocket for necessary prescription drugs,” said Congressman Courtney. “For many eastern Connecticut seniors on fixed incomes, average savings of more than $1,100 per year means the difference between buying medication or food, and being able to live with dignity in retirement. In addition, the ACA has stabilized Medicare Part B premiums, which have not increased since 2013.”
 
The chart below shows the top 20 eastern Connecticut towns with the largest savings totals in 2014: 
 
 
 
Additional town-by-town data available on request.
 
Nationwide, in 2014 5.1 million Medicare beneficiaries saved $4.8 billion on their prescription drugs thanks to the Affordable Care Act closing the Part D ‘donut hole.’ Since 2010, when the provisions began to close the coverage gap, 9.4 million beneficiaries have saved a total of more than $15 billion. 
Additional town-by-town data available on request.
 
Nationwide, in 2014 5.1 million Medicare beneficiaries saved $4.8 billion on their prescription drugs thanks to the Affordable Care Act closing the Part D ‘donut hole.’ Since 2010, when the provisions began to close the coverage gap, 9.4 million beneficiaries have saved a total of more than $15 billion. 
 
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